Sun Risk Management Blog

 

Live Well, Work Well – June 2018

Health and wellness tips for your work and life—presented by Sun Risk Management, Inc.

Over 200 Rare Antibiotic-resistant Genes Found in 27 States, Report Shows

A Vital Signs report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that more than 200 rare antibiotic-resistant genes were found in bacteria tested in 2017.

According to CDC principal deputy director, Dr. Anne Schuchat, 2 million Americans get sick from antibiotic resistance, and 23,000 die from such infections each year.

The CDC is now promoting an aggressive containment strategy that includes rapid detection tests and screening for reducing the spread of antibiotic resistance. They also ask that you take simple preventive measures like washing your hands and getting vaccinated. For more information, click here.

Strawberries Named Dirtiest Produce for 3rd Year in a Row by EWG

Every year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) releases a Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce report that details which fruits and veggies are the least—and most—contaminated by pesticides. The guide is designed to help you make healthy and informed choices and reduce your exposure to toxic pesticides.

For the third year in a row, strawberries top the “Dirty Dozen” list of the most pesticide-tainted produce, with one-third of all conventional strawberry samples containing 10 or more pesticides. One sample even contained 22 pesticide residues.

The other fruits and vegetables on the Dirty Dozen list are:

  • Spinach
  • Apples
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Celery
  • Sweet bell peppers
  • Nectarines
  • Grapes
  • Cherries
  • Tomatoes
  • Potatoes

While pesticides boost crop yields, multiple studies have linked pesticides in produce to conditions like asthma, cancer, fertility issues and brain conditions. The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station recommends rinsing produce under water for 30 seconds to get rid of pesticide residues. For more information, visit EWG’s website.

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Fried Rice

2 Tbsp. vegetable oil

3 cups brown rice (cooked)

1 carrot (cut into ¼-inch slices)

½ cup bell pepper (chopped)

½ cup onion (chopped)

½ cup broccoli (chopped)

2 Tbsp. low-sodium soy sauce

½ tsp. black pepper

1 tsp. garlic powder

2 medium eggs (beaten)

¾ cup chicken (cooked, chopped)
PREPARATIONS

  1. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat.
  2. Add rice and stir for 5 minutes.
  3. Stir in carrot, bell pepper, onion, broccoli, soy sauce, black pepper and garlic powder. Cook until vegetables are tender.
  4. Remove mixture from pan.
  5. Pour eggs into pan and scramble.
  6. Put vegetable mix and rice back in the pan and mix with scrambled eggs.
  7. Add chicken and cook until hot. Serve warm.

Makes: 6 serving
Nutritional Information (per serving)

Total Calories 203
Total Fat 7
Protein 9 g
Carbohydrates 26 g
Dietary Fiber 3 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Sodium 269 mg
Total Sugars 2 g

Source: USDA

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Intermittent Fasting: What it is and Why People Are Doing it

Intermittent fasting is one of the latest health trends that has been gaining traction quickly. Intermittent fasting can look very different from person to person, but the two most popular approaches are:

  1. 5:2 approach: In this approach, you restrict your calorie consumption to 25 percent of your daily needs twice a week, and eat normally the remaining five days of the week.
  2. Eight-hour approach: In this approach, you fast for 16 hours a day, eating only during an eight-hour time period.

Studies have shown that intermittent fasting can have powerful benefits on your body and mind, and for weight control. Other studies state that it can also protect against Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

As with any diet plan, it’s important to talk with your doctor before you start. For more information on intermittent fasting, or its benefits and drawbacks, click here.

live-well-june

Posted in Monthy Newsletter, Wellness |

Live Well, Work Well – May 2018

Health and wellness tips for your work and life—presented by Sun Risk Management, Inc.

Researchers Link New Danger to E-cigarettes

The use of electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes has grown exponentially in recent years—especially among young adults in the United States.

The liquid used in e-cigarettes contains nicotine and other harmful chemicals, including heavy metals and carcinogens. The liquid nicotine used in e-cigarettes comes in thousands of different flavors, many of which are appealing—and harmful—to teenagers.

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego found that popular fruity vape flavors appear to contain the highest levels of cancer-causing materials. The study recommends that parents warn teens of the dangers associated with e-cigarettes to discourage usage.

Despite CDC Recommendation, Many Adults Still Refusing Shingles Vaccine

Shingles is an extremely common—and painful—viral infection, affecting 1 out of every 3 Americans at some point in their life. It’s caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox, so anyone who has had chickenpox is at risk of developing shingles. After a person recovers from chickenpox, the virus remains dormant in the body. While scientists are unsure what causes the virus to awaken at a later date, they do know that the only way to reduce the risk of getting shingles is to get vaccinated.

Recommended Shingles Vaccine

The CDC recommends that adults use a new vaccine called Shingrix instead of Zostavax, which had been the recommended vaccine from 2006-2017. Shingrix provides strong protection against shingles and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), the most common shingles complication. In studies, two doses of Shingrix were found to be more than 90 percent effective at preventing shingles and PHN.

Who Should Get Vaccinated?

The CDC recommends that healthy adults 50 years and older get two doses of Shingrix, two to six months apart. People who have had shingles in the past, have received the Zostavax vaccine or are unsure if they have had chickenpox should also receive the Shingrix vaccine, according to CDC recommendations.

To find doctor’s offices or pharmacies near you that offer the vaccine, visit HealthMap Vaccine Finder.
sunriskinc

Barley Pilaf

1 Tbsp. vegetable oil

1 cup onion (chopped)

½ cup celery (chopped)

½ cup red or green bell pepper (chopped)

1 cup mushrooms (sliced)

2 cups water or chicken broth

1 tsp. low-sodium vegetable bouillon

1 cup pearl quick-cooking barley
PREPARATIONS

  1. Heat medium-sized pan over medium heat. Add vegetable oil, onion and celery. Cook, stirring often until onion is soft.
  2. Add bell pepper, mushrooms and pearl barley. Stir well.
  3. Add water and bouillon and stir to dissolve bouillon. Bring to a boil. Lower heat and cover pan.
  4. Cook for 50 to 60 minutes or until barley is tender and liquid is absorbed.

Makes: 8 serving
Nutritional Information (per serving)

Total Calories 119
Total Fat 2 g
Protein 2 g
Carbohydrates 24 g
Dietary Fiber 3 g
Saturated Fat 0 g
Sodium 11 mg
Total Sugars 1 g

Source: USDA

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May is Food Allergy Action Month

A food allergy occurs when the body has a specific immune response to certain foods. Sometimes, the body’s response can be severe or life-threatening. Food allergies are a growing food safety and public health concern, according to the CDC. It is also estimated that between 4 and 6 percent of U.S. children are affected by some type of food allergy.

Among other things, Food Allergy Action Month was created to spread awareness about what food allergies are, how to recognize them and how to help someone who is having an allergic reaction. Common symptoms of an allergic reaction to food include the following:

  • A tingling sensation in the mouth
  • Swelling of the lips, tongue and throat
  • Itching, hives and a rash throughout the body
  • Cramping, diarrhea or vomiting
  • Wheezing and difficulty breathing
  • Dizziness or lightheadedness
  • Loss of consciousness

The 8 foods that cause the most allergies

Posted in Monthy Newsletter, Wellness |

Benefits Buzz – May 2018

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HR Brief – May 2018

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HR Brief – April 2018

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HR-Brief-April-2018

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HR Brief – March 2018

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HR-Brief-March-2018

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Compliance Bulletin – IRS Reduces H S A Limit for Family Coverage 2018

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Benefits Buzz – April 2018

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Benefits-Buzz-April-2018

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Benefits Buzz – March 2018

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Benefits-Buzz-March-2018

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Live Well, Work Well – March 2018

Health and wellness tips for your work and life—presented by Sun Risk Management, Inc.

This Deadly Flu Season is the Worst in Nearly a Decade

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the 2017-18 flu season is more intense than any other since the 2009 swine flu pandemic. Unfortunately, the CDC says this flu season is going to get worse.

In addition to the increasing number of individuals falling ill with the flu, the hospitalization rate for the flu has jumped. This year’s dominant virus, H3N2, has been around for 50 years, but it is usually the most lethal of the seasonal strains.

As a result, the CDC urges those who haven’t yet gotten the flu vaccine to do so, as it is the best way to prevent the flu. Because some doctors and pharmacies have run out of vaccines, check here to find out where you can obtain your vaccination.

Eating Healthy Doesn’t Have to Be Expensive

Eating a well-balanced diet is a key component in living a long, healthy life. Many Americans think that eating healthy means they have to empty their wallets, which isn’t necessarily the truth. Keep the following money-saving tips in mind next time you’re grocery shopping:

  1. Make a weekly meal plan. Before you go to the store, think about what meals and snacks you want for the week. Read recipes thoroughly so you can make an accurate list of everything you need, reducing the risk that you’ll have to run back to the store later in the week.
  2. Create a list—and stick to it. Make a detailed list of what you need to buy before you go to the store. When you get to the store, don’t buy anything besides what’s on the list.
  3. Plan where you’re going to shop. Many grocery stores run sales or offer coupons on various healthy foods. Check out the ads and plan your grocery list around what’s on sale.
  4. Shop seasonally. Fresh fruits and vegetables that are in season are usually easier to get and may be a lot less expensive. Click here for a list of what’s in season.
  5. Cook at home as often as possible. Many foods prepared at home are cheaper and more nutritious. Go back to the basics and find a few simple and healthy recipes that your family enjoys.

sunriskinc

One Pan Potatoes & Chicken

4 medium potatoes

1 pound chicken breast (boned and skinned)

2 Tbsp. oil

1 cup salsa

1 15-ounce can whole kernel corn (drained)
PREPARATIONS

  1. Cut potatoes into ¾-inch cubes.
  2. Cook potatoes over medium-high heat until fork-tender. Remove from pan.
  3. Heat the oil in a skillet over high heat. Brown the chicken for 5 minutes.
  4. Add the potatoes back into the pan and cook until lightly browned.
  5. Add salsa and corn. Cook until heated through.
  6. Serve warm.

Makes: 6 serving
Nutritional Information (per serving)

Total Calories 285
Total Fat 7 g
Protein 21 g
Carbohydrates 35 g
Dietary Fiber 4 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Sodium 316 mg
Total Sugars 3 g

Source: USDA

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Sleep and Your Health

The National Sleep Foundation sponsors Sleep Awareness Week every March to educate Americans on the importance of sleep to their overall health and well-being. The CDC has linked insufficient sleep to the development of chronic diseases and conditions, including diabetes, heart disease, obesity and depression. In honor of Sleep Awareness Week occurring this March 11-17, try adopting the following five healthy sleep habits:

  1. Keep a regular schedule—try to go to bed and wake up at the same time each day, including weekends.
  2. Create a good sleep environment, including comfortable room temperature, minimal noise and sufficient darkness.
  3. Keep track of habits that help you fall asleep, like relaxing music or reading before bed. Repeat those activities each night.
  4. Avoid caffeine and nicotine three to four hours before going to bed.
  5. Limit alcohol before bed, as it can reduce sleep quality.

Posted in Monthy Newsletter, Wellness |