Sun Risk Management Blog

 

Benefits Buzz – May 2018

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Benefits-Buzz-May-2018

Posted in Health Care Reform |

HR Brief – May 2018

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HR-Brief-May-2018

Posted in Large Group Employers, Small Group Employers |

HR Brief – April 2018

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HR-Brief-April-2018

Posted in Large Group Employers, Small Group Employers |

HR Brief – March 2018

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HR-Brief-March-2018

Posted in Large Group Employers, Small Group Employers |

Compliance Bulletin – IRS Reduces H S A Limit for Family Coverage 2018

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Posted in Health Care Reform |

Benefits Buzz – April 2018

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Benefits-Buzz-April-2018

Posted in Health Care Reform |

Benefits Buzz – March 2018

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Benefits-Buzz-March-2018

Posted in Health Care Reform |

Live Well, Work Well – March 2018

Health and wellness tips for your work and life—presented by Sun Risk Management, Inc.

This Deadly Flu Season is the Worst in Nearly a Decade

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the 2017-18 flu season is more intense than any other since the 2009 swine flu pandemic. Unfortunately, the CDC says this flu season is going to get worse.

In addition to the increasing number of individuals falling ill with the flu, the hospitalization rate for the flu has jumped. This year’s dominant virus, H3N2, has been around for 50 years, but it is usually the most lethal of the seasonal strains.

As a result, the CDC urges those who haven’t yet gotten the flu vaccine to do so, as it is the best way to prevent the flu. Because some doctors and pharmacies have run out of vaccines, check here to find out where you can obtain your vaccination.

Eating Healthy Doesn’t Have to Be Expensive

Eating a well-balanced diet is a key component in living a long, healthy life. Many Americans think that eating healthy means they have to empty their wallets, which isn’t necessarily the truth. Keep the following money-saving tips in mind next time you’re grocery shopping:

  1. Make a weekly meal plan. Before you go to the store, think about what meals and snacks you want for the week. Read recipes thoroughly so you can make an accurate list of everything you need, reducing the risk that you’ll have to run back to the store later in the week.
  2. Create a list—and stick to it. Make a detailed list of what you need to buy before you go to the store. When you get to the store, don’t buy anything besides what’s on the list.
  3. Plan where you’re going to shop. Many grocery stores run sales or offer coupons on various healthy foods. Check out the ads and plan your grocery list around what’s on sale.
  4. Shop seasonally. Fresh fruits and vegetables that are in season are usually easier to get and may be a lot less expensive. Click here for a list of what’s in season.
  5. Cook at home as often as possible. Many foods prepared at home are cheaper and more nutritious. Go back to the basics and find a few simple and healthy recipes that your family enjoys.

sunriskinc

One Pan Potatoes & Chicken

4 medium potatoes

1 pound chicken breast (boned and skinned)

2 Tbsp. oil

1 cup salsa

1 15-ounce can whole kernel corn (drained)
PREPARATIONS

  1. Cut potatoes into ¾-inch cubes.
  2. Cook potatoes over medium-high heat until fork-tender. Remove from pan.
  3. Heat the oil in a skillet over high heat. Brown the chicken for 5 minutes.
  4. Add the potatoes back into the pan and cook until lightly browned.
  5. Add salsa and corn. Cook until heated through.
  6. Serve warm.

Makes: 6 serving
Nutritional Information (per serving)

Total Calories 285
Total Fat 7 g
Protein 21 g
Carbohydrates 35 g
Dietary Fiber 4 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Sodium 316 mg
Total Sugars 3 g

Source: USDA

live-well-march-02

Sleep and Your Health

The National Sleep Foundation sponsors Sleep Awareness Week every March to educate Americans on the importance of sleep to their overall health and well-being. The CDC has linked insufficient sleep to the development of chronic diseases and conditions, including diabetes, heart disease, obesity and depression. In honor of Sleep Awareness Week occurring this March 11-17, try adopting the following five healthy sleep habits:

  1. Keep a regular schedule—try to go to bed and wake up at the same time each day, including weekends.
  2. Create a good sleep environment, including comfortable room temperature, minimal noise and sufficient darkness.
  3. Keep track of habits that help you fall asleep, like relaxing music or reading before bed. Repeat those activities each night.
  4. Avoid caffeine and nicotine three to four hours before going to bed.
  5. Limit alcohol before bed, as it can reduce sleep quality.

Posted in Monthy Newsletter, Wellness |

Live Well, Work Well – February 2018

Health and wellness tips for your work and life—presented by Sun Risk Management, Inc.

Avocados: A Legitimately Healthy Food Craze

According to Telsey Advisory Group, a firm focused on evaluating the consumer market, avocado consumption in the United States has quadrupled since 2000. And, unlike many other health food crazes, avocados are actually good for you.

While it is true that avocados contain more calories and fat than other fruits or vegetables (one-fifth of an avocado contains 50 calories and 4.5 grams of fat), they also have many health benefits. Avocados contain heart-healthy unsaturated fat, which can help lower cholesterol. In addition, they are packed with vitamins, minerals and fiber that are part of a healthy diet.

2 Chronic Conditions That Can Cause Cancer

New research suggests that nearly 6 percent of cancers (792,600 cancer cases) can be at least partly attributed to obesity and diabetes. The study, which was published online on The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology website, states that diabetes and a high body mass index (greater than 25) are both associated with a higher risk of certain cancers and are increasing in prevalence.

Fortunately, Type 2 diabetes and obesity can be prevented with proper lifestyle changes, which include the following:

  • Avoiding tobacco
  • Exercising regularly
  • Maintaining a healthy weight
  • Eating a healthy diet and limiting your intake of unhealthy foods
  • Managing your stress
  • Regularly checking your cholesterol and blood pressure
  • Visiting your doctor for routine preventive care

Implementing the above prevention tips can help you remain healthy and avoid developing chronic conditions like obesity and Type 2 diabetes, which, in turn, can help lower your risk of certain cancers. For more information, please review the full-text version of the study.
sunriskinc

Mexican Chicken Soup

3 pounds chicken pieces (skin removed)

2 cups tomatoes (chopped)

1 clove garlic (minced)

½ cup onion (chopped)

¼ cup mild canned chilies (diced)

2 cups canned pinto or garbanzo beans (drained)

PREPARATIONS

  1. Place chicken pieces in a large saucepan and add enough water to cover.
  2. Cook until tender, about 25 minutes.
  3. Remove chicken pieces from the broth.
  4. Add tomatoes, garlic, onion and chilies.
  5. Remove chicken meat from the bones and return meat to broth.
  6. Add beans, and salt and pepper to taste. Simmer for about 15 minutes.

Makes: 6 serving
Nutritional Information (per serving)

Total Calories 390
Total Fat 14 g
Protein 49 g
Carbohydrates 16 g
Dietary Fiber 5 g
Saturated Fat 4 g
Sodium 460 mg
Total Sugars 2 g

Source: USDA

live-well-march-02

A Common Cold Can Be Contagious for Longer Than You Think

The winter months are commonly associated with decreasing temperatures and increasing cases of the common cold. Typically, symptoms of the common cold come on gradually, and may start with a sore throat or irritated sinuses.

According to Healthline, when you have a cold, you’re contagious approximately one to two days before symptoms start and can continue to be contagious for up to seven days after you’ve become sick. Unfortunately, many people can’t stay home for that long of a time to fully recover. Consider the following suggestions to help avoid becoming ill or passing on a cold to a co-worker, friend or family member:

  • Wash your hands with warm water and soap often.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, mouth and nose.
  • Sanitize commonly touched surfaces.
  • Always cough and sneeze into your elbow—not your hands—to prevent spreading germs.

live-well-feb-2018

Posted in Healthcare, Monthy Newsletter, Wellness |

Live Well, Work Well – January 2018

Health and wellness tips for your work and life—presented by Sun Risk Management, Inc.

Winter Sports Safety Tips

The cold, crisp air and breathtaking views are just a few of the simple joys associated with winter sports. To ensure that your skiing or snowboarding excursions remain safe, be sure to keep in mind the following five tips:

  1. Inspect your skiing or snowboarding equipment to ensure that it is in good working condition.
  2. Wear protective headgear, such as a helmet and snow goggles.
  3. Yield to skiers or snowboarders in front of or below you on the slope.
  4. Carry a fully charged cellphone with you at all times.
  5. Never drink alcohol while skiing or snowboarding.

January: Thyroid Awareness Month

The thyroid gland is a small, butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of the neck that helps control the function of many of the body’s organs and helps to set the metabolism. According to the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, approximately 20 million Americans have some form of thyroid disease and an estimated 12 percent of the population will develop a thyroid condition in their lifetime.

Fortunately, the American Journal of Medicine reports that early detection of a thyroid disorder is as cost-effective as early detection of common chronic conditions. In honor of Thyroid Awareness Month, take some time to become familiar with the most common risk factors, which include the following:

  • Being female—Women are five to eight times more likely to suffer from a thyroid disorder than men are.
  • Age—The Thyroid Foundation of America recommends that women get annual thyroid hormone level tests yearly starting at age 50 and that men should get yearly tests beginning at age 60.
  • A family history—If thyroid disease runs in the family, testing every five years after age 35 is recommended.
  • Pregnancy—Thyroid conditions can arise after giving birth.

Those with a high risk of developing a thyroid disorder should speak with their doctor. Together, you can determine the next steps to take.

sunriskinc

Green Onion Omelet

1 15-ounce can sliced potatoes (drained)

1 Tbsp. vegetable oil

1 large whole egg

3 egg whites

3 Tbsp. low-fat milk

¼ tsp. salt

½ cup ham (diced)

½ 8-ounce can tomatoes (drained)

1 Tbsp. scallions (chopped)

PREPARATIONS

  1. Cut sliced potatoes into strips.
  2. In a large skillet over medium heat, lightly brown potatoes in the vegetable oil for 5-10 minutes.
  3. In a mixing bowl, add egg, egg whites, milk and salt. Mix well.
  4. Stir in ham, tomatoes and scallions.
  5. Pour egg mixture over potatoes in the skillet.
  6. Cover skillet and continue to cook eggs over medium heat until firm, not runny (about 8 minutes).
  7. Cut the omelet into four pieces and serve.

Makes: 4 serving
Nutritional Information (per serving)

Total Calories 184
Total Fat 7 g
Protein 15 g
Carbohydrates 16 g
Dietary Fiber 1 g
Saturated Fat 2 g
Sodium 283 mg
 Total Sugars  2 g

Source: USDA

live-well-march-02

3 Steps to an Injury-free Workout

Exercise is a great way to combat stress, lose weight and boost energy. To get the most from your workouts, you should add warming up, cooling down and stretching to your routine. These three simple steps are proven to help prevent painful and costly injuries.

  1. Warming Up

Warming up allows your body time to adjust from rest to activity. Always remember to gradually increase the intensity of your warmup to reduce stress on your bones, muscles and heart.

  1. Cooling Down

As with warming up, cooling down should include movements similar to those in your workout, but at a gradually decreasing level of intensity.

  1. Stretching

After cooling down, stretching helps to build flexibility and range of motion. When stretching, follow the guidelines below:

  • Use gentle and fluid movements and breathe normally.
  • Never force a joint beyond its normal range of motion; you should not feel any pain.

live-well-jan-2018

Posted in Healthcare, Monthy Newsletter, Wellness |